“No Hard Copy – No Copycat”, a brand new Media Records EVO claim

Gianfranco Bortolotti, Media Records EVO CEO, has launched a tantalizing initiative on digitalization. The Italian businessman, with his international brands, is supporting bit flows, taking a step back from dominating trends: the release of vinyl records. The claim is “No Hard Copy – No Copycat”. Gianfranco Bortolotti is supporting the new technology, discouraging the use and distribution of physical supports and non-original song-writing. “At a time of relentless change, going back is not just a nostalgic attitude, it’s a myth that old school djs flaunts to secure their consoles”, said Gianfranco Bortolotti.

“It’s like old politicians saying that young people are not ready, because they don’t have any political experience and blah, blah, blah, and basically they just want to secure their power.
It’s just obvious that music flows digitally, that young people fit more with the new technology and that there are young talents”, added Gianfranco Bortolotti. “It’s just sheer madness if you say that vinyl records (we are not supporting vinyl records: No Hard Copies) will save music. The debate with arguments like “Digital sound is cold” and “Analogic sound is hot” is absolutely dull. This is just instrumental to keep things as they are, especially in Europe. Original contents are the actual point, this is what is becoming standardized. But I keep believing in young generations and in spite of myself, as I respect old generations, I also had a critical role in that. I believe young people are the future”.

There’s also another point to make (‘No Copycat’): “Today, vinyl records have a super-niche market for collectors, fans who are ready to pay any price, devotees, enthusiasts, and their common feature is the notion of an alternative based in the past. However, this passion may also result from a contemporary status in the current state of play. If you are tied to the past, it’s like being chained as you look at the future. Does it still make sense today? Yes, if young generations will not use new technologies to release heaps of useless tracks; instead, they should use platforms to acquire the skills they need, they must not try their luck producing brainless tracks, useless and recycled instrumental sample tracks”.

Lately, the focus has been on music hardware, i.e. music production (see old skool synthesizers), so what will happen next? There’s an overwhelming and utmost respect for anything historic or vintage, just like art, poetry, historical sites, anything basically. “Why not be inspired by the research that great artists of all times have performed to produce their works? Why should we not do as they did, i.e. acquiring the right skills in high profile academies and schools? In the past, great artists would travel for months to reach the location of art schools Now there’s Internet with appropriate locations to learn the art of production. Whether ancient or contemporary, anything standing the test of time results from a total – and unquestionably sacred – fusion with the spirit of the artist. In this sense, young people should learn from those who came before them”.